My Genetic Genealogy

Paternal Ancestry Signature          (Y-Chromosome Test)

 

Results for: Albertus (Bert) - S300059All

from Relative Genetics Laboratory

 

Locus  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Value 11 15 12 13 29 25 11 13 13 14 12 15 12 12 26 11 11 11 12 11 09 14 24 12 19 23

 

Locus    27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43

Value    14   17   12   12   13   19   30   30   15   19   09   10   25   15   15   16   17

 

Locus (Marker)Key (1-26)

1) DYS385a 5) DYS389II 9) DYS393 13) DYS438 17) DYS455 21) GGAAT1B07

2) DYS385b 6) DYS390  10) DYS19  14) DYS439 18) DYS460 22) GATAA10

3) DYS388  7) DYS391  11) DYS426 15) DYS447 19) DYS461 23) DYS635

4) DYS389I 8) DYS392  12) DYS437 16) DYS454 20) DYS462 24) GATAH4.1

25) YCAIIa 26) YCAIIb

Locus (Marker) Key (27-43, added in Sep 2004)

27) DYS441  31) DYS446  35) DYS456  39) DYS463  43) DYS464d

28) DYS442  32) DYS448  36) DYS458  40) DYS464a

29) DYS444  33) DYS449  37) DYS459a           41) DYS464b

30) DYS445 34) DYS452  38) DYS459b           42) DYS464c

 

Notes to the Marker Key

1)    DYS385a – the value, originally B, was converted to 11.

2)    DYS385b – the value, originally F, was converted to 15.

 4) DYS389I - the original value 12, was increased by 1, to 13

10) DYS19   – was formerly known as DYS394.

15) DYS447  – not one of the original 26, was added later.

19) DYS461  – in June 2004 this value was increased by 1, to 12.

23) DYS635  – this marker was known until July 2004 as YGATAC4.

24) YGATAH4 – originally 27, this value was decreased by 15, to 12, and since June 2004 has been known as TAGA H4.

25) YCAIIa  – originally D, was converted to 19.

26) YCAIIb  – originally H, was converted to 23.

 

Postscriptum: as of dec 2007 several scores have been changed by the laboratories, as follows:

27) DYS441 - formerly 13, has been increased by one to 14.

28) DYS442 - formerly 12, has been increased by five to 17.

34) DYS452 - formerly 11, has been increased to 30.

39) DYS463 - formerly 23, has been increased to 25.

12) GATA-A10 – formerly 12, has been increased to 14.

24) GATA-H4.1 – until 2004 this marker was known as YGATAH4; between 2004 and Dec 2007 as TAGA H4; its value – at first 27, was later reduced to 12, and then increased again to 22; in 2009 was this marker renamed GATAH4, and the value was reduced by 10, thus, in my case, to 12.

Overview

 

     On 24 Feb 2002 at my home in Amsterdam I swabbed the inside of my mouth with a cotton stick provided by the Laboratory of Relative Genetics. I sent the sample in to them on the following day. This report presents my Paternal Ancestry Signature as revealed by analysing 26 (later, 43) different locations on my Y-chromosome. The fascinating aspect of the Paternal Ancestry Signature is that it does not uniquely identify me as a single individual, but uniquely identifies my paternal line back through history that extends beyond written records, as the Y-chromosome is passed down intact from father to son through many generations. The Paternal Ancestry Signature is made up of 26 (later, 43) different data points (called loci or markers) that are analysed for the number of repeats at the location. These repeats are known as STR’s (Short Tandem Repeats). (Some markers have multiple alleles. Thus, 385a and b are actually one marker with two alleles, as are 459a & b; 464a, b, c & d; and YCAII a & b.) 

     In July 2004 I did another DNA test at my home, this time with DNA Heritage in England. My test values for the 43 markers of DNA Heritage happily coincide with my test values of the corresponding markers of Relative Genetics (see hereunder):

 

Marker

DYS19

DYS385

DYS388

DYS389I

DYS389II

DYS390

DYS391

DYS392

DYS393

DYS426

Value

14

11-15

12

13

29

25

11

13

13

12

Marker

DYS437

DYS438

DYS439

DYS441

DYS442

DYS444

DYS445

DYS446

DYS447

DYS448

Value

15

12

12

13

12

12

12

13

26

19

 

Marker

DYS449

DYS452

DYS454

DYS455

DYS456

DYS458

DYS459

DYS460

DYS461

DYS462

Value

30

30

11

11

15

19

9-10

11

12

11

Marker

DYS463

DYS464

DYS635

Y-GATA-A10

Y-GATA-H4

Y-GGAAT-1B07

YCAII

Value

25

15-15-16-17

24

12

11

9

19-23

Relative Genetics genetic genealogy company was taken over by AncestryDNA in 2008. Some projects hosted at Relative Genetics were transferred to DNA Heritage.

DNA Heritage in turn was acquired by Family Tree DNA in April 2011. On 1 July 2011 my Y-Chromosome test results were transferred, and the number of markers reduced from 43 to 25. FTDNA also determined my Haplotype to be R1b1a2 (in 2014 renamed R-M269), and my deep genetic ancestry to be 100 percent European (circa 87 percent ‘western european’, circa 13 percent ‘other european’).  On 12 Dec 2013 I finally upgraded from Y-DNA 25 to Y-DNA 37 markers. The results for all 37 markers, ready on 23 Jan 2014, can be seen hereunder:

 

PANEL 1 (1-12)

Marker

DYS393

DYS390

DYS19**

DYS391

DYS385

DYS426

DYS388

DYS439

DYS389I

DYS392

DYS389II***

Value

13

25

14

11

11-15

12

12

12

13

13

29

PANEL 2 (13-25)

Marker

DYS458

DYS459

DYS455

DYS454

DYS447

DYS437

DYS448

DYS449

DYS464

Value

19

9-10

11

11

26

15

19

30about 20 000

15-15-16-17

PANEL 3 (26-37)

Marker

DYS460

Y-GATA-H4

YCAII

DYS456

DYS607

DYS576

DYS570

CDY

DYS442

DYS438

Value

11

11

19-23

15

15

17

18

37-37

12

12

    

     On 21 February 2013 I ordered the FTDNA Family Finder Autosomal DNA test: the results were ready in May 2013. This test analyses all 23 chromosomes for genetic matches across the whole spectrum of ancestral lineages. Later on in 2013 four of my maternal brothers also did both the Autosomal and Y-Chromosome tests offered by FTDNA. We all have many genetic ‘cousin’ matches of various degrees. A few matches have been proven by the genealogical records to be 4th cousins on our mother’s side, the exact relationship as genetically determined by Family Tree Family Finder. By comparing my matches with those of my brothers, I can tell which ones are most likely maternal and which are paternal, the paternal matches being those which the other brothers do not have in common with me. On 12 December 2013 I also ordered the mtFullSequence test (Direct Maternal Line, the maternal quasi-equivalent of the Y-Chromosome Direct Paternal Ancestry Line). On 30 January 2014 I received the results: my mtDNA haplogroup is U5b2b3a. The origin of U5b2 dates to about 20 000 years ago. Members of the U5b2 lineage were amongst the first people to repopulate Europe after the Ice Age. However, Neolithic farmers and herders from West Asia crowded out the U5b2 lineage as they entered Europe. U5b2 is now about 2 percent of the population in Europe, being found most often in northern Europe, including England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Russia. In May 2014 FTDNA introduced ‘My Origins’, and determined, through precise dna analysis, that I am genetically 100 percent Western European: British Islands – 35 %; Western & Central Europe (Germany, Netherlands, France) – 33%; Scandinavia – 32%. 

In September 2014 I ordered and did the 23andMe saliva test for genetic analysis. I received the preliminary results within a few days! 23andMe determined my maternal haplogroup to be U5b2b (the same haplogroup assigned me by FTDNA), and my paternal haplogroup to be R1b1b2a1a2d* (U-152) (N.B. - the FTDNA nomenclature is somewhat different). In addition, 23andMe determiend that I am 2,7 percent Neanderthal, which is precisely the European average. En fin, 23andMe has determined that I am 99,99% European, even more precisely, 97,8% Northern European. My places of ancestral origin within Europe are: Ireland, England, Germany, Netherlands, Scandinavia. 

 

In February 2016 I ordered the AncestryDNA saliva test kit for autosomal DNA testing. AncestryDNA has determined that I am over 99 percent European: 67% Western Continental Europe, 14% Ireland, 12% Scandinavia, 5 More regions. As of June 2016, at AncestryDNA I already had ninety genetically and genealogically confirmed maternal cousin matches of various degrees from First Cousin to Ninth Cousin. Through DNA matching and genetic genealogy I was able to determine and confirm the identity of my father’s parents, his four grandparents, his eight great-grandparents, and six of his great-great-grandparents; I was also able to reduce the identity of my father to one of two brothers – H. & D. -  both sons of Frank Casimir Jung. On Easter Sunday (17 April) 2017 the DNA test results of the grandson of H. became known, and he proved to be my closest paternal match yet, my First Cousin Once Removed, thus proving that the younger brother, his granduncle  – D. Jung – is my father. DNA matching combined with family tree analysis is a powerful tool indeed! And today I feel like a very lucky man indeed to have been so helped by it. Deo gratias!       

 

On 30 Jan 2016 my FTDNA Y-DNA Markers were upgraded from 37 to 67, as reported hereunder:

 

PANEL 1 (1-12)

Marker

DYS393

DYS390

DYS19**

DYS391

DYS385

DYS426

DYS388

DYS439

DYS389I

DYS392

DYS389II***

Value

13

25

14

11

11-15

12

12

12

13

13

29

PANEL 2 (13-25)

Marker

DYS458

DYS459

DYS455

DYS454

DYS447

DYS437

DYS448

DYS449

DYS464

Value

19

9-10

11

11

26

15

19

30

15-15-16-17

PANEL 3 (26-37)

Marker

DYS460

Y-GATA-H4

YCAII

DYS456

DYS607

DYS576

DYS570

CDY

DYS442

DYS438

Value

11

11

19-23

15

15

17

18

37-37

12

12

PANEL 4 (38-47)

Marker

DYS531

DYS578

DYF395S1

DYS590

DYS537

DYS641

DYS472

DYF406S1

DYS511

Value

11

9

15-16

9

10

10

8

11

10

PANEL 4 (48-60)

Marker

DYS425

DYS413

DYS557

DYS594

DYS436

DYS490

DYS534

DYS450

DYS444

DYS481

DYS520

DYS446

Value

12

23-23

16

10

12

12

15

8

12

22

20

13

PANEL 4 (61-67)

Marker

DYS617

DYS568

DYS487

DYS572

DYS640

DYS492

DYS565

Value

12

11

13

11

11

12

12

 

 

Using the Results of the Y Chromosome Matches

 

     The raw numbers begin to take on genealogical significance when the results are compared with other people and population studies. My full Paternal Ancestry Signature is like a family fingerprint that identifies my paternal male relatives, i.e., who share a common forefather with me on the direct paternal line (my father’s father’s father’s father, for example). All other ancestors play no part whatsoever in passing down the Y-chromosome, thus these test results say absolutely nothing about them. Hopefully these test results will be compared to the test results of many others. A perfect match of my Y-chromosome’s markers with the markers of another’s Y-chromosome will prove that we are related to each other in direct descent from a common male ancestor on our father’s side within eight generations counting from my generation backwards in time, and that we should share the same surname (keeping in mind, however, that non-paternal events would influence the surname, so that, for example. One value off on one marker (a mutation) would still indicate blood relationship and descent from a common forefather, but more likely at eight or more generations back in time. (The number of generations is not definite, but based on probabilities, as it is still not known precisely how often or seldom in time a mutation takes place). In Europe there are three main Haplogroups: HG1, HG2, HG3. A haplogroup is a collection of closely related haploid cell genotypes (haplotypes). As science progresses, so does our knowledge of these haplogroups: thus their names and descriptions are ever-changing.

.

                                                                        

NoordwestEuropa

 

North-Western Europe - geographic place of origins of my Y-Chromosome, Autosomal DNA & mtDNA

 

The newest information on haplotype R1b1a2 (R-M269) (Jan 2014 update)

 

     Prior to 2002, today's Haplogroup R1b had a number of names in differing nomenclature systems, such as Hg1 and Eu18. From 2003 to 2005 what is now R1b1a2 was designated R1b3. From 2005 to 2008 it was R1b1c. From 2008 to 2011 it was R1b1b2. R1b1a2 (2011 name) is defined by the presence of SNP marker M269. European R1b is dominated by R-M269. The frequency is about 71% in Scotland, 70% in Spain and 60% in France. In south-eastern England the frequency of this clade is about 70%; in parts of the rest of north and western England, Spain, Portugal, Wales and Ireland, it is as high as 90%; and in parts of north-western Ireland it reaches 98%. [ Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_R1b_(Y-DNA) ]

 

 

For further information on the subject of genetic genealogy:

 

http://www.familytreedna.com/

http://www.gedmatch.com/

https://www.23andme.com

http://dnaadoption.com.gerbera.arvixe.com/Home.aspx

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/AncestryDNA

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Y-DNA_STR_testing_chart

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_testing_comparison_chart

http://www.clanlindsay.com/genetic_dna_glossary.htm

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/reprint/98/9/5078.pdf

 

For information on U-152:

 

http://www.eupedia.com/forum/threads/25962-R1b-U152-S28-more-Gaulish-or-Roman

http://www.davidkfaux.org/R1b1c10_Resources.pdf

 

And for possible DNA matches see this on-line Y-chromosome database:

http://www.ysearch.org/

 

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